18 – The novice pilots

Two of the four hijack pilots were refused rental of small single-engine planes just weeks before the attacks because they proved themselves unable to control the crafts, and none of the pilots was very experienced; flight instructors who taught them cited poor attention spans, poor English, poor understanding of the controls – and three of them, including ringleader Mohamed Atta, were advised to quit.

The 9/11 Commission declared Hani Hanjour the most experienced pilot of all (p530). Yet numerous statements from people who taught or flew with Hanjour, the alleged pilot of flight 77 which supposedly hit the Pentagon, say he could barely fly at all – yet he apparently pulled off incredible manouevres that expert commercial and military pilots with thousands of hours of experience say they themselves could not have done. These unbelievable manouevres include handling cumbersome passenger planes as if they were agile military jets, flight speeds and G-forces that should have ripped the aircrafts apart, and hitting their targets with mind-blowing precision.

According to the black box allegedly from flight 77, the hijackers also miraculously managed to take control of the plane without opening the cockpit door at any point in the flight. Amazing!

“I flew the two actual aircraft which were involved in 9/11… I don’t believe it’s possible for… a terrorist to train on a [Cessna] 172, then jump in a cockpit of a 757-767 class cockpit, and vertical navigate the aircraft, lateral navigate the aircraft, and fly the airplane at speeds exceeding its design limit speed by well over 100 knots, make high-speed high-banked turns, exceeding — pulling probably five, six, seven G’s. And the aircraft would literally fall out of the sky. I couldn’t do it and I’m absolutely positive they couldn’t do it.” — Capt. Russ Wittenberg, US Air Force. Retired commercial pilot, flew Boeings for Pan Am and United Airlines for 35 years, totalling 30,000+ hours. Former US Air Force fighter pilot with over 100 combat missions.

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